Gallery

WELCOME TO OUR DOTS ‘N DOODLES GALLERY

Disclaimer:  We do not claim ownership over any of the images posted in this gallery with the exceptions of those noted.  Some of the following images may have been taken from the internet, face book or have been provided by participating artists.  If you are the owner of an image(s) and would like them removed please contact me under our contact tab and I will immediately do so.

These images & videos are meant to inspire, inform and educate.  ENJOY!!!

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Rock painting has become a national past time.  Here are some of the painted rocks from the Astoria area.

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Our buddy Bryce Harris is a local Astoria artist doing some very interesting work that represents the Oregon coast. In the spirit of American modern art Bryce is moving his paintings from canvas to wood in a unified and related way. Check out some of his new pieces. It is really interesting to see artists interpret the shape of a substrate and the related image that is painted on it.

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Don Colley

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Don Colley regularly demonstrates techniques using Faber-Castell artist pens, pencils etc.  Don also talks about his journey and carries with him a number of finished and in-process pieces that illustrate the differences in using premium quality Faber-Castell products.  His main staples include PITT® Artist Pens, Polychromos Color Pencils, Albrecht Durer Watercolor Pencils, charcoals and graphite.  

 

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Featured Artist
Noel Thomas
Who Knew!!!.  Noel and Pat were miniaturists before transforming himself into sketcher, painter and local Astoria art mentor.
Here is an excerpt from the Tomas’ page:

Noel & Pat Thomas

In 1974, Noel and Pat Thomas built a dollhouse for Noel’s daughter, not knowing they were embarking on a 36-year career of building miniatures for collectors and museums. By the time of their retirement in 2011, they had created 64 structures, including houses, commercial buildings, out-buildings, and roadside stands, all built in the conventional dollhouse scale of 1/12th or 1″=1′.
Rather than being models, each project is an original Thomas design, based on a specific period of architecture, or a particular full-sized structure. After thirty Victorian structures, their work evolved into the Bungalow style, including three projects based on the Pasadena, CA works of Charles & Henry Greene. Smaller commissions have included European toy shops, a roadside Airplane Cafe, a Maine motor court cabin, and a theater.
The Thomas’s trademark is the aging process–sometimes referred to as “Thomas grunge.” Their houses have a history–a patina of age and weather, along with subtly-detailed evidence of human occupation. Their work is more that of painters than of builders, in that they work to create a “feeling,” an illusion of reality that evokes memories from the viewer. These memories are jogged by such details as broken lattice where a dog might have scratched his way under the house, smudges around doorknobs and stair railings, peeling paint at the back door, and rusted chimney flashing. They taught their techniques in workshops all over the country, as well as  for 29 years with the IGMA Guild School in Castine, ME. For 25 years Pat wrote a how-to column on their techniques for various miniature magazines
Both Noel and Pat are Fellows in the International Guild of Miniatures Artisans (IGMA), and lifetime members of the National Association of Miniature Enthusiasts Academy of Honor. The Thomases and their work appeared on numerous television programs, including NBC’s Today Show and syndicatedEvening-format shows. Their work has been exhibited in Japan, as well as three miniature museums in the US. Their work has appeared on the cover on the cover of a Hammacher Schlemmer catalog, as well as in such magazines as Architectural Digest, Elle Decor, Americana, and Historic Preservation.
http://www.thomasopenhouse.com/gallery.html

 

Paris also gave me a renewed look at my own surroundings–the endlessly beautiful world of the river, the ships, our own street corners–of which I will never tire.” …Noel Thomas
Noel is an accomplished watercolor painter, and a signature member of both the American and Northwest Watercolor Societies.  Pat is an award-winning poet whose first book, The Woman Who Cries Speaks was published in 2008 by Lost Horse Press. Before miniatures they were in advertising–Noel an art director, and Pat a copywriter.
Watercolors on Yupo
Hadn’t a ninth-grade teacher, a Mrs. B. Johnson, read the tea leaves of his life? Hadn’t she told him to step up, to pursue his talent? “Go to school and be an artist,” she had insisted. Sure, it seemed that everyone could see that the boy could draw, even fellow soldiers. He drew their portraits for $2 each. But years before, while speaking to his favorite teacher, he had asked, “Just where should I go?” Published on November 10, 2005 12:01AM Daily Astorian

 

“Well,” Mrs. Johnson answered, taking in the boy’s steady steely-blue eyes, “You should go to the Los Angeles Art Center.” So, one afternoon while lying on a cot in the Army barracks, that particular discussion rushed back into his brain. It rushed in like a freight train with a mission.  Published on November 10, 2005 12:01AM Daily Astorian

 

‘Just a year later, Thomas found himself enrolled in that fine institution, enrolled with a double major, illustration and advertising. Thank you, Mrs. B. Johnson. Thank you to every great teacher who shapes a student. Thomas talks about that teacher and other mentors with sincere affection and admiration. The man can flush effusive.’  Published on November 10, 2005 12:01AM Daily Astorian
http://www.noelthomaspaints.com/
Noel’s sketches on the covers of Dots ‘N Doodles Sketch books
www.dotsndoodles.com
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Rick Pass Featured Artist
Master Duck Decoy Artist

For several years now a quiet and unassuming man has been coming to Dots ‘N Doodles Art Supplies.

Seeking out brushes, paint and eventually air brushes Tim and I discovered that Rick Pass is not only a really nice guy but a dedicated artist making duck decoys as well.  This past time has quite a following in our area on the Oregon and Washington coast.  Rick’s eye for detail and accuracy is reflected in his wonderful work which is intricately carved and painted.  When pressed Rick modestly allows that he has been to national competitions and has won awards for his work.

“My interest in artistic decorative decoy carving began in 1995 when I admired the work of my friend.  A few years later, Clatsop Community College offered a course taught by local artist Bill Antilla.  It was not until retirement when time became available to pursue my new passion full-time carving.  The past four years, significant time, effort and travel have been employed studying and refining the skills necessary to become a professional carver. 

Numerous days learning under the guidance world class carvers such as Pat Godin

(ON, Canada), Laurie McNeil (Minnesota), Vic Kirkman (North Carolina), and Brad Snodgrass (Oregon) advancing my skills.  Additionally, three years of weekly carving class in Vancouver Washington, DVD instruction from Willy McDonald (Michigan), live online instruction. several seminars and one-day classes from master carvers throughout the United States have enhanced my artistic skills.

 

 
These decorative decoys will compete in the annual Ward World Wildfowl Carving Championships in Ocean City, Maryland. Artists from around the world attend this event.  This will be my 4th trip to OC and the second time competing.

 

Many thanks to Scott and Tim for providing artistic inspiration, guidance on airbrush tools, brushes and paints, and for providing artistic expertise.  The Astoria community is fortunate to have Dots-N-Doodles!!! “
 
 
Commissions are welcomed.
 
 
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A short video of my way to draw fur.

Full detailed version can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYPLPRULxBw&t=11s

If you find this video helpful, feel free to share it.

It’s all about using different hardness from different pencils to create some contrast and using small pencil lines to create the fur. I finish it off with a tortillion to fill in white areas. I do this technique over and over again till I get the result I want.

DON’T FORGET to follow me on my other social media!!! – Yankeestyleart

 

 

 

 

The Sketch Book of artist Gerald Brommer

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David Kitler – Canadian Artist

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Carl Dalio – Watercolor Artist